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We did our best to warn you that the upcoming, surprise Switch releases of Zombies Ate My Neighbors and its sequel Ghoul Patrol would be accompanied by physical releases from Limited Run Game. But would any warning have really prepared you for this?

Well, if I'm gonna be impoverished, it might as well be by this.

Look, I don’t care what you say – the Amiga versions of The Secret of Monkey Island and LeChuck’s Revenge are the only Monkey Island-s you need. And now you can play them through the streaming service Antstream Arcade. What is Antstream Arcade? I have no clue, but it exists, and it has the Amiga versions of Monkey Island. The service is available for Windows, Mac, Android, Linux, Amazon Fire, and Nvidia Shield.

You can try the Antstream for free; after that, it’s £9.99 a month. I could not find any dollar or euro prices.

(Some might also argue UAE is a better alternative, but I’ll leave that up to the individual.)

As long as we're on the subject of Laserschwert, did you know that he recently gave his frame-ready poster download of the Monkey Island 2 cover art a material upgrade? You better give your eyeballs a head-up on this one.

You see, a 1991 issue of the UK-based magazine "The One" contained a large, fold-out poster of Purcell's artwork, making it a superior scanning source to the box, or for that matter anything else known to exist. A generous fan in possession of that particular issue heard the call of duty and sent the precious reference material to the pre-eminent authority in this field, who then worked his arts:

Read more and collect your upgrade in Laserschwert's stickied poster thread, where the latest version of his offerings can always be found.

Boy, it's almost like reading the forums is a good idea or something.

Well, I didn't know about all that. Luckily, Laserschwert was able to steer me to the following tweet when I showcased my ignorance on the forums, thereby putting me In The Know™.

Now that's putting your license with Lucasfilm to good use. We'll just have to contain ourselves until all is divulged in June. In the meantime: woot.

And that's awesome.

More, please.

Update: Oh nice, there's a trailer, too, revealing extra features that include a behind-the-scenes gallery.

I’ve been told anecdotally that there are a number of public Discord channels where Mixnmojo readership types congregate and make predominately harmless mischief together. Being that I’m in my late eighties, I don’t keep up with such things myself and instead rely upon a few well-placed sources to funnel back the highlights to the nursing home I occupy.

All this is to explain Mojo’s palsied reaction to a rather stunning turn of events: Skunkape’s Randy Tudor, who served as a gameplay programmer both on Sam & Max: Freelance Police as well as the Telltale seasons, offered up without comment [that I know of] the following from his personal archive to the community of a Sam & Max Discord:

That would of course be Freelance Police project lead Mike Stemmle on the receiving end of Max’s ire. All signs point to this being produced during that cancelled game’s development -- perhaps as part of some web-based marketing that didn’t see the light of day, or maybe it’s just some internal nonsense the team made to amuse themselves?

We may never know, but like all untimely Freelance Police flotsam that makes it to the shoreline, it’s getting gracelessly stuffed into our big fat article where all extant media related to that martyred sequel shall collect like barnacles until the end of the internet.

We've learned that LucasArts games tester Judith Lucero has passed away. Monkey Island creator Ron Gilbert shared some thoughts on her importance at his blog.

Although she isn't in the opening credits to Monkey Island 2, Gilbert's post proves she did work on it. Her name appears in the opening to The Secret of Monkey Island, and her list of credits speaks for itself.

Mixnmojo gives its condolences to her family and loved ones.

Okay listen, headline aside, I'm gonna dial back on the snark that it has been politely noticed I tend to dish out when Limited Run Games robs a deserving SCUMM title of one of these top notch packaged releases by routing the budget to a Star Wars title instead while their licensing arrangement with Lucasfilm presumably tick, ticks away.

It's inappropriate, it's not the time, and frankly it's not reading the room.

So in the interest of fair play here - and for gosh sakes, what do I stand for if not fair play? - and without further unsolicited commentary from the peanut gallery, here is the announced Star Wars: Republic Commando boxed set, presented in its full glory:

But if I could just say one thing. Limited Run? You listening? I want to run something past you right quick. It'll just take a second.

You get it, Limited Run Games?

See what I'm saying, Limited Run Games?

I love you, Limited Run Games.

Those revived forums are paying for themselves! The venerable “monkeyboobs” started a thread upon noticing the following submission on Unseen64:

A good few years ago I was contacted by one of the lead devs of the original Zombies Ate My Neighbours game. He was a fan of the channel and thanked me for making a video on the franchise :)

If that wasn’t cool enough he then went on to explain that a TRUE sequel was pitched but sadly not successful. Here are a couple of pics he showed me from that original pitch. The plan was that I would interview him and show off more, but sadly that never happened :(

We have lost contact over the last couple of years now and I have been sitting on these images for a long time not really knowing what to do with them! So, before I accidentally delete them I feel it is best that I share them with the world :P

Zombies Ate My Neighbors (1993) has had an impressively unsuccessful time of getting continuations off the ground. The only direct sequel was Ghoul Patrol (1994), which began its life as an unrelated game before the Zombies protagonists were slapped on it at the eleventh hour. In terms of gameplay if not genre, Herc’s Adventures (1997) could quite reasonably be thought of as a third installment, while a proposed tribute game called Demons Ate My Neighbors looks to be going for something much more faithful to the original.

The book Rogue Leaders revealed that LucasArts began work on another game that was intended to be kindred to Zombies back in 2000. The game, code named Sawyer, was abandoned when its team was reassigned to Star Wars: Bounty Hunter. Concept art can be seen here. Is Sawyer the same game as this alleged Zombies Ate My Neighbors 2, or something different altogether? We may never know, but dropping a quirky game in favor of an Attack of the Clones tie-in is some classic turn-of-the-century LucasArts.

Comments: 1 / Source: Unseen64

We often talk about the LucasArts adventure catalog as numbering fourteen, starting the count with Maniac Mansion (1987) -- a first both for the SCUMM engine and for Lucasfilm Games’ status as a publisher.

But the fact is, the oft-snubbed Labyrinth: The Computer Game (1986) was the first adventure product the studio developed, and with its “word wheel” concept – a prototypical stab at a graphic adventure interface that in fact appears only after a text-based prologue – it’s of substantial academic interest unto itself, not to mention one of the earliest examples of a commercially successful movie tie-in of its genre.

And as it turns out, its development was pretty interesting, too. Speaking to Retro Gamer last month, David Fox reminisces about the project’s production, which included a trip to the UK for a brainstorming session with two of his heroes, Douglas Adams and Jim Henson:

One night Douglas invited us over to his house for dinner and Jim Henson was also invited. He was sitting right across the table from me and if I was a little intimidated by Douglas I was probably more so by Jim because I knew his work even more. I'd be eating my food and every once in the while I'd hear Kermit The Frog across the table from me. Jim was really kind, humble, unassuming. Douglas was too, they were both extremely warm creative people who I felt honoured to be in the presence of. I also remember that when Jim arrived he came with a huge smoked salmon, maybe three foot long. That was intended as a joke, so Douglas could say at the end of the evening, 'So long and thanks for all the fish!'

Like most (all?) of Lucasfilm Games’ pre-Maniac catalog, Labyrinth isn’t commercially available, but there are probably ways to play it for the enterprising spirit while waiting for the inevitable German-made fan remake.

How many times have you asked yourself, “Self, I wonder what the CMI audition material looks like?” Odds are never, because who would even think about anything like that. Turns out spielbergfan1 did, as he has gotten his grubby hands on 70+ pages of the stuff. To quote:

This took some time to fully collect, but the bundle is FINALLY complete! Behold, the original audition copy, character sketches, some cutscene storyboards, and even an unused background plate/game sequence angle thrown in for good measure for "The Curse of Monkey Island!" An immense thank you to my contact, who worked on this game, for providing me with all of this! "The Curse of Monkey Island" is very near and dear to my heart, and I’m beyond elated that I have the honor of getting to preserve this material from the LucasArts days of old (it makes me sad to type that out). Anyway, I hope you enjoy this blast of nostalgia. I know I did! Here’s hoping we one day get more games (and even a movie or two) from this franchise!

As the man of fine taste he is, he decided to send it all to us. To wit:

  • View it all as images, or...
  • Download the PDF!

Thanks spielbergfan1! #2 is just an ass in our book.

Image

A big collection of prototype and review copies of PS2 games has been released by preservation site Hidden Palace. This includes a number of Lucasarts games such as Secret Weapons Over Normandy, RTX Red Rock, Wrath Unleashed and Gladius.

Sadly EMI wasn't among the dumps but I'm sure our readers are already scrabbling to uncover the differences in Wrath Unleashed. A game that Mojo memorably predicted "may end up being a complete turd".


We all know and love Laserschwert for his important contributions to the art of LucasArts postercraft, and have for some time now. But while Mojo recognizes greatness on sight, the mainstream media, typically dazzled by the distracting rather than the first rate, has been slow to kiss the ring.

Are they starting to wise up? That's the signal being put out by the latest issue of Retro Gamer. Operating under the preposterous alias of Jan Hofmeister, Laserschwert sat for an interview that appears in their March issue. You can buy your very own copy below.

News for a slow week: If, like me, you're working, bored of music, and not doing great because it's spring and you're stuck in a place you were supposed to be visiting for a few weeks but wound up a whole year in due to a pandemic mishandled by the two countries you live in inside, you might enjoy YouTuber BuzzMoo's lovely Monkey Island ambience videos. It's like being outside, but with Michael Land music.

Hey, I'm grateful. Stuff like this helps.

Comments: 1 / Source: YouTube

The newly re-christened LucasFilm Games – round and around we go – is hitting the ground running. Working with Bethesda and Machine Games, a new Indiana Jones game is on its way:

No word what platforms the game will be available for, but if memory serves me right, Bethesda is now a Microsoft joint, so take from that what you want.

So, teasing by Craig Derrick regarding a Monkey Island TV series not punishing enough? Step right up, son of David Bowie and movie director, Duncan Jones (Moon, Source Code, and um, Warcraft), who spent his lockdown adapting the Full Throttle script for screen.

Kotaku has broken the story, nicked from Duncan's twitter feed.

If you know any movie studio bosses looking for something to fund, point them towards the pdf in Duncan's dropbox there.


Comments: 2 / Source: Kotaku

Yesterday Gamasutra reported the passing of Kelly Flock, who was the General Manager of LucasArts in the early-to-mid 90s.

It is noteworthy when a management figure is as fondly remembered by developers as Flock seems to be. He wielded greenlight power during a time when the studio could boast being at a creative height, and various accounts portray him as instrumental in that status due to his championing of original titles.

It was Flock who approached Steve Purcell about licensing his comic strip characters to the company to initiate Sam & Max Hit the Road; Dave Grossman cites Flock as the influential force in the assignment of himself and Tim Schafer to a Maniac Mansion sequel as project leads; Mike Ebert remembers Flock as a counterbalance to "politics," and credits him for approving games like Zombies Ate My Neighbors and Metal Warriors. Ebert even suggests that he left LucasArts largely because Flock did.

May it weigh heavy on his conscience!

You should read the whole thread, which includes this reply to an inquiry about a CMI remaster:

COMI remaster is tricky. I looked into it years ago (as some have mentioned before) but I was always more interested in what we could do with Maniac Mansion first. Haven’t given up that idea quite yet.

I know Craig doesn't mean to be cruel, but tell it to the lacerations on my beleaguered heart.

Comments: 7 / Source: Twitter

Get a load of this!

Comments: 1 / Source: Twitter

Sixteen years after Maniac Mansion Deluxe, another LucasArts oldie has received a fan remake of astonishing care – the oldie, it could be argued. The decade-long labor of love Fractalus is now available for Windows, MacOS and Linux, and it’s probably as fine example of this sort of thing that comes along. May I present my first witness: the project lead of the 1984 original?

If that’s not enough to make you download the game, I’m not sure what else can be done for ya. Highest marks to the Australian enthusiast who apparently masterminded this. One wonders: is the Land Down Under to Rescue on Fractalus! what Germany is to the SCUMM games?

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