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Continuing today's accidental theme of Sam's voice actors, Gameranx has an interview with Bill Farmer. Farmer is of course best known as the voice of Goofy for Disney, but Sam & Max gets a mention as well:

Gameranx: You voiced Sam in Sam & Max Hit the Road, whose voice sounds like a more toned-down version of Goofy. Phonetically, how did you make them different?

Bill Farmer: Well Steve Purcell had brilliant dialogue for the game, and I wanted to bring something deadpan but still comedic to the role. So it was a bit of Johnny Carson and more Humphrey Bogart.

Farmer also explains why he did not reprise the role for the television show, which was new to me:

You never know why you don’t get something. They just don’t call. Maybe they forgot I was in the first one, maybe they found somebody they liked better, who knows. That’s part of the business. Like with Sam & Max, they did a cartoon show which was not union. I’m a union actor. They took that to Canada to cast which is why I didn’t do that. And so maybe they got on that non-union bandwagon, and you never know with all the politics. A lot of it’s politics, too. So you just stay grateful for the ones you get, and say, hey I’m available if you need me!

Visit Gamerax to listen to the audio recording of the full interview.

Comments: 4 / Source: Gameranx

Harvey Atkin, who voiced Sam in the Sam & Max animated series, passed away on July 18th. Atkin was the second of three voice actors who have so far taken on the role of Purcell's character, though he is more widely known for his roles on TV shows such as Cagney and Lacey and Law and Order, as well as the Ivan Reitman comedy Meatballs, which he co-starred in opposite Bill Murray.

Thanks to "Threepwood4life" for bringing this to our attention in the comments.

Let's get right to it!

First, Batman: The Enemy Within will be hitting computer and console platforms on August 8th, with iOS and Android to follow "later this year". The first game made Batman v Superman look like a laugh riot, so yeah... (I'll still play it, like the tool I am.)

Meanwhile, the franchise has finally been bled dry: The Walking Dead: The Final Season is scheduled for a 2018 release. Odds of Clementine surviving the season is if TTG's history is anything to go by, slim.

More importantly, The Wolf Among Us's sequel is also slated for 2018. I personally consider the Fables based game to be TTG's second best after Sam & Max: The Devil's Playhouse so hooray for that.

And, a video:

Our fine friends over at The Onion have pulled a Mojo and reviewed ranted about the TT Games LEGO Indiana Jones videogame series some years after release.

Consider: While the Indiana Jones of film punches out Nazis, his mute Lego doppelgänger spends far more time attacking trees and flowers. Indy can scarcely walk five steps without finding a cluster of greenery that he’s compelled to destroy in order to collect the tiny Lego studs that constitute the in-game currency. Even when outrunning the giant boulder—that most iconic moment from Raiders—he’s evidently supposed to risk his life brutalizing the vegetation for a few extra studs. So you’ll understand, Adam, if I’m at a bit of a loss as to what makes this game “pretty fun.”


Bravo Onion, bravo.

If you have a quarter of an hour to spare, why not watch the first episode of a LEGO fanfilm adaptation of the classic LucasArts Star Wars shooter Dark Forces III: Jedi Knight II: Jedi Outcast.



If the youtube video doesn't display above, use this link instead.

Comments: 3 / Source: Youtube

Ronzo took to Twitter yesterday and announced an announcement of Thimbleweed Park (a recently released adventure game) for Switch. There is even a video...

Screw Super Mario Odyssey, you clearly need to complete your Thimbleweed Park collection instead!

PC Gamer published an interview with Tim about Full Throttle in their June issue, but you don't buy magazines anymore, so you didn't read it. At least not until its ink exclusivity ended and it wound up online, which is now.

At the time a LucasArts adventure was expected to sell around 100,000 copies, but Full Throttle sold over a million. And now, 22 years later, the game has been re-released with remastered graphics and audio. I ask the game’s writer/director Tim Schafer what it’s like going back to something he made when he was in his early 20s.

“It’s been interesting looking at how I wrote dialogue back then based on my life experiences at the time, and how I interpret it differently now that I’m older,” he says. “And now that I’ve actually been a biker on the run for a crime I didn’t commit, that adds a lot of depth to it too. I had no idea what that was like back then.”

You know what I did in my early 20s? Not make Full Throttle. Learn more about how Tim outclassed me by reading the full article.
Comments: 1 / Source: PC Gamer
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