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Telltale "more likely to focus on original properties" 19 Aug, 2008, 01:29 / 7 comments

Today is/was already the first day of GCDC in Leipzig, Germany (remember, there's supposed to be some major A Vampyre Story presence there), and Gamasutra met up with the one and only Dan Connors to talk about Telltale. Dan discusses the difficulties of putting an episodic game in the online console space, and a few interesting statistics are made known:
20 percent of players who buy a first episode next buy the whole season altogether, says Connors. Without providing specifics, he also said "most players" buy the whole season at once directly from Telltale, while "retail is the most powerful content-mover out there."
Read it all! And as always, be sure to check Telltale's blog section for the latest article related to the company. That way we can get away with forgetting to mention them.

Comments

  • The Tingler on 19 Aug, 2008, 15:49…
    I'm interested in the bit at the end, where Dan still counts Bone as one of their franchises. Or am I drawing too much into that?
  • Udvarnoky on 19 Aug, 2008, 17:53…
    Unfortunately, probably so.
  • Zaarin on 19 Aug, 2008, 19:06…
    He mentions Bone in that Norwegian interview where he says it was a more difficult concept to sell than he had thought.
  • jp-30 on 19 Aug, 2008, 04:19…
    "most players" buy the whole season at once directly from Telltale, while "retail is the most powerful content-mover out there."

    I'm sure I'm just missing the meaning of the statement, but this sounds like a contradiction. If most player are buying a whole season direct from Telltale, why is retail more powerful than that?
  • jp-30 on 19 Aug, 2008, 04:20…
    Oh, I guess he's talking in general, not in Telltale's specific case?
  • Udvarnoky on 19 Aug, 2008, 06:01…
    I read it as, of the people who buy from Telltale, most people buy the whole season upfront rather than buying a single episode first.
  • jp-30 on 19 Aug, 2008, 06:23…
    Hmm, yeah, probably taken from 2 different parts of the interview, but edited close together in a single paragraph to confuse me.