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Maniac Mansion: The Liner Notes The NES album, annotated

Maniac Theme
Composed by Chris Grigg and David Lawrence
Arranged by David Warhol

The theme from the computer version is naturally retained for the console release, where it’s been translated with flair by David Warhol. There is a certain “attitude” to the NES version soundtrack that this new version of the theme introduces us to nicely. Sanger recalls that Warhol would push the music in what he called an atonal, “Jetsons”-style direction. To bring its personality into sharp relief and because it is after all a cover, be sure to compare the NES version to the original version, in all its PC speaker glory. And so long as you're paying homage, why not check out original composer Chris Grigg's web presence?
Maniac Theme, Reprised
Arranged by David Warhol

As with the PC versions of the game, the theme is reprised when the game is completed (for better or for worse). Unlike the PC versions, Warhol delivers a variation to send the player out on – one where he puts a little more English on the ball.
Dave’s Theme
aka "The Boys Are Still Back" by Fat Patty
Composed by Dave Hayes
Arranged by David Warhol

Since Dave is a non-optional character, this may be the most ubiquitous track in the game. The song’s title and putative band are clearly a play on “The Boys Are Back In Town” by Thin Lizzy, so it seems the protagonist is partial to hard rock. And it seems the video game cover band Descendants of Erdrick is partial to this song – enjoy their live performance from 2011. This guy ain't bad, either.
Razor’s Theme
aka "No No Never Never Well Maybe Sure Okay" by The Void
Composed by George Alistair Sanger
Arranged by David Warhol

It is only right that Razor would be listening to punk rock. The track title is plainly a wink at “Never Say Never” by Romeo Void. Sanger: “That was purely punk...really, I kind of stuck to ‘God Save the Queen.’ It’s mostly my version of the Sex Pistols. That one-note melody that’s just shouted.”
Bernard’s Theme
aka “Comp-U-Nerd” by the Rocket Scientists
Composed by David Govett
Arranged by David Warhol

The name of the track is probably a nod to Devo’s “Girl-U-Want.” David Govett recalls: “I already had the Comp-U-Nerd one done previously as a demo song as I was learning my way around synthesis and MIDI technology and simply conformed it to the now famous song. It was a perfect home for the song as it turns out. It was inspired by 80s and 90s film sound track near the time, most likely Mannequin (Andrew McCarthy film)”. Sanger recalls that Govett jumped at the opportunity to tackle this particular theme, which he believes was based on the song that plays over the end credits of Revenge of the Nerds. Decide for yourself!
Syd’s Theme
aka "Psychedelic Brie" by Metalflake
Composed by Dave Hayes
Arranged by David Warhol

The title is a probable nod to “Alan’s Psychedelic Breakfast” by Pink Floyd. A passage from that lengthy song may be the reference point for Syd's theme, but more musical ears than mine will have to ferret out which.
Wendy’s Theme
aka "Sonatina in G Opus 47 BVW 801"
Composed by David Govett
Arranged by David Warhol

Govett: "I think Wendy’s (classical) theme was inspired by 'Britannia' and a classic violin sonata I was learning on Marimba in my college percussion recital days and other stereotypical classical piano/quartet styles."
Jeff’s Theme
aka "Surf Face" by Goofy Feet
Composed by George Alistair Sanger
Arranged by David Warhol

Surf music was the only genre appropriate for the surfer character. The fictional band is a reference to The Lively Ones, a surfer band which had a song called “Goofy Foot” along with several songs and albums that began with the word “Surf”. As for the melody, Sanger tells us: “There’s a song by the Astronauts...one of theirs that I really took all the chords from, and then shuffled them around and put them back together into my own tune.” Be sure to check out the live version of "Surf Face" performed by Team Fat.
Michael’s Theme
aka “Flashbulb Funk” by Princess
Composed by Dave Hayes
Arranged by David Warhol

“We Can Funk” by Prince is obviously the target here.
Edison Theme
aka “Better Ed Than Dead”
Composed by George Alistair Sanger
Arranged by David Warhol

This is heard during the cutscenes and the appearances of Green Tentacle, making this cue the theme for the deranged Edison family as a whole. Sanger: “You know what? I think there was a TV theme...I think it was The Mothers-In-Law...since it was a family theme, I was looking a 60s sitcom theme to sound like. But, you know, a monsterish family.”
Mark Eteer’s Theme
aka “Go See Mark”
Composed by David Govett
Arranged by David Warhol

This is theme played for the marketing executive, who appears when the player turns on the television set in the mansion music room, as well as when items are mailed to him in his skyscraper office. Govett: “I think the Mark theme may also be known as the TV ad. If that is correct, then this one was inspired through George Sanger, from the old ‘Cal Worthington’ style Car Dealership local commercials with a country music theme.” The Cal Worthington commercials that I'm familiar with use as their jingle the children's tune "If You're Happy And You Know It" with altered lyrics, and that song does seem to be the basis for Mark's theme.
Eddie Van Tentacle
Composed and arranged by David Warhol

This is the song on Green Tentacle's demo tape. In Maniac Mansion, his band is dubbed GT and the Suction Cups, while in Day of the Tentacle he's the frontman for GT and the Sushi Platters -- who certainly have a vastly different sound.
Doo Dop Deep
Composed and arranged by David Warhol

This is the song that Syd or Razor will perform when you have them play the piano. In the original computer game, Razor and Syd play something rather different.
Wink Smiley’s Theme
aka "Heeeeeeeere's Talk-Show Host"
Composed by Dave Hayes
Arranged by David Warhol

This is a track you’re only going to hear if you reach the ending where Wendy retypes the Meteor’s manuscript and scores him a publishing contract, culminating in the reformed villain's guest appearance on Wink Smiley’s talk show. The title is of course a reference to Ed McMahon’s intro for Johnny Carson, and the tune is probably meant to evoke The Tonight Show's theme, while the prominent chin of Smiley’s NES sprite will surely call to mind Jay Leno.
Evil Dr. Fred
Composed by George Alistair Sanger
Arranged by David Warhol

This is an unused track that fans discovered in the game’s resource files. Sanger: “I have no idea why it wasn’t used. I was very proud of that tune. It was in the demo cassette that I sent out around then. I sent out the world’s first demo tape for getting video game gigs. The assignment was to write a tune that would suit an evil doctor.” It is believed this track, which has a passage simulating laughter, would have occurred toward the end of the game, when Dr. Fred activates the self-destruct sequence in the secret lab. It does have a certain “time is running out” vibe. Warhol himself does not remember the reasons for its exclusion, other than being certain it was not quality related.